Category: Events

Summersell Center to Host Tera Hunter on January 25

 

Dr. Tera Hunter

Dr. Tera Hunter, Edwards Professor of American History and Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, will deliver a public lecture on African America marriage in slavery and freedom on January 25, at 4:30 PM, in 30 ten Hoor Hall.

Hunter’s Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2017) won the Fourth Biennial Deep South Book Prize from the Summersell Center for the Study of the South.

According to the Belknap Press, “Bound in Wedlock is the first comprehensive history of African American marriage in the nineteenth century. Uncovering the experiences of African American spouses in plantation records, legal and court documents, and pension files, Hunter reveals the myriad ways couples adopted, adapted, revised, and rejected white Christian ideas of marriage. Setting their own standards for conjugal relationships, enslaved husbands and wives were creative and, of necessity, practical in starting and supporting families under conditions of uncertainty and cruelty.

“After emancipation, white racism continued to menace black marriages. Laws passed during Reconstruction, ostensibly to secure the civil rights of newly freed African American citizens, were often coercive and repressive. Informal antebellum traditions of marriage were criminalized, and the new legal regime became a convenient tool for plantation owners to discipline agricultural workers. Recognition of the right of African Americans to enter into wedlock on terms equal to whites would remain a struggle into the Jim Crow era, and its legacy would resonate well into the twentieth century.”

Mississippi State University Professor Jason Morgan War to Speak Thursday, Oct. 12, at 5 PM

This image is a poster for the event and contains the same information as this post.
Follow the link in the image above for a full-size poster for the event.

The Summersell Center of the Study of the South and The University of Alabama Department of History will host Professor Jason Morgan Ward of Mississippi State University on Thursday, October 12, 2017, at 5 o’clock in room 30 ten Hoor Hall.

Ward is the author of Hanging Bridge: Racial Violence and America’s Civil Rights Century (2016) and Defending White Democracy: The Making of the Segregationist Movement and the Remaking of Racial Politics, 1936-1965 (2011).

Ward’s talk is entitled, “Lifting the Veil: A White Alabama Graduate Undercover in Jim Crow Mississippi.”

This event is sponsored by the Summersell Center for the Study of the South and The University of Alabama Department of History. The event is free and open to the public.

“Dixie’s Great War: World War I and the American South” Symposium to be held October 6.

This image is a pretty bad graphic showing three views of WWI camps in Alabama.Register today and plan to attend the one-day symposium, “Dixie’s Great War: World War I and the American South,” to be held Friday, October 6, 2017 at the Ferguson Center Great Hall on The University of Alabama’s campus in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

This image shows an Alabama soldier during World War I.

The Dixie’s Great War symposium, hosted by the Summersell Center for the Study of the South, “is considered to be the largest conference in the country on World War I and the South,” says John Giggie, Associate Professor and Director of the Summersell Center for the Study of the South at The University of Alabama.

This program, cohosted by Professor John Giggie and Professor Andrew Huebner, will feature internationally renowned scholars of the First World War from around the country:

Panels will focus on the war’s political, social and cultural impact on the South in general as well as Alabama in particular.

The symposium is free and open to the public, though registration is required. A reception will follow the closing of the last session, and books by the participating scholars will be available for purchase.

To register or view the agenda, please visit dixiesgreatwar.ua.edu.

For more information, please contact Sea Talantis at stalantis@ccs.ua.edu or 205-348-3014, or Lauren Lewis at llewis@ccs.ua.edu or 205-348-6222.

Black/White Intimacies: Reimagining History, the South, and the Western Hemisphere

This image is of a flyer for the conference.This two-day symposium explores interracial interactions and the forming of American culture during the antebellum period and beyond. We will address questions such as:

  • What were the limitations of interracial intimacies and how might people have addressed those limitations in various settings – domestic spheres, legal systems, religious spaces, classrooms?
  • If people across races and cultures lived, ate, slept, and traveled together, what were the implications for cultural understanding—or lack thereof?
  • What was interracial intimacy and how might expressions of such intimate contact have been guided by race, gender, and class?

Keynote addresses will be delivered by Professors Michael Bibler, LSU, and Rebecca Wanzo, Washington University, St. Louis.

A highlight of the weekend will be a Friday evening performance by Professor E. Patrick Johnson, who is Carlos Montezuma Professor and Chair of African American Studies at Northwestern University.

The symposium will begin at 9 a.m. on April 21, 2017, at the Hotel Capstone.

This image shows a poster advertising the performance by Professor E. Patrick Johnson.